Saturday, May 20, 2017

Historical Sew Monthly

This is my very late Historical Sew Monthly entry! This skirt is made of 3 rectangular panels of silk, shaped a little at the top to accommodate the bum pad.


 The Challenge: April: Circles, Squares & Rectangles – Many historical garments, and the costumes of many people around the world, use basic geometric shapes as their basis. In this challenge make a garment made entirely of squares, rectangles and circles.

 Material: Silk taffeta

 Pattern: Patterns of Fashion/made up Year: 1776-80

 Notions: cotton thread, cotton twill tape

 How historically accurate is it? I give it a 95% as its entirely handsewn

 Hours to complete: Six maybe? I don't use a timer.

 First worn: not yet

 Total cost: About $30

I have not been keeping up on the Historical Sew Monthly. I am realizing how much I hate deadlines. Having a deadline before an event is one thing, but these arbitrary HSM deadlines are not my cup of tea. It's too bad because I enjoy the idea of the challenge themes! So we'll see how many more challenges I end up doing.

Friday, May 19, 2017

A New Project

I haven't had a new historic project since I finished my plain and simple dress without a lot of frippery in January. This project wasn't on my To Do list, but I've had the fabric for ages and it's been rattling around in my head for awhile.

First some inspiration. I am not trying to copy and specific dress. My fabric is my starting point.

This one from the Kyoto book is probably my main inspiration. I love the stripes and the trim, which looks like box pleats plus something extra. And I love the fact that it's all self-fabric. The only thing I don't like is that it's cut with no waist seam (polonaise) which is pretty but I have no idea how to make it fit. So I will actually be making an anglaise.

Yellow striped silk taffeta Robe à la polonaise, c.1780's Hooked closure at front; buttons to tack robe; matching petticoat. Following the trend toward simple clothing, women's costumes in the 1780s became more casual & fabrics used to make dresses had a light texture. ©The Kyoto Costume Institute, (KCI) photo by Takashi Hatakeyama:

A great skirt shape here.

c1776 French Fashion Plate - Back View:

This one has the en fourreau back I plan to do.

Wool Damask Robe a l’Anglaise, 1785 Diadema Morgan wore this gown at her wedding to Phineas Field of Northfield in 1785.:

I knew I wanted the skirt silhouette to be HUGE. I tried on all my false rumps and pads but nothing was big enough. So I made a new one! Here it is in progress. I promise I sewed the waistband down properly later.


Here's what I've actually sewn so far. It's slow going because I am doing it 100% by hand. The skirt is together but not hemmed. The fabric is striped silk taffeta.


It's huge on the sides!


It's huge in the back!


It's huge all around!


The trim will be pinked self-fabric. I have obtained a new rotary blade for this that cuts scallops, which is a slightly more interesting look than plain zigzag pinking. Plus, scallops are period!



Of course I had to do a comparison. From top to bottom, new scallop blade, old pinking blade, normal pinking shear.


When I started this dress a few weeks ago, I thought I would whip it out real quick and wear it to our 18th century picnic event this weekend. HAHAHAHAHAHAHA. I now plan to finish it for Costume College this summer.